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A shining talent in an unexpected place

Recently, our team fell in love with the weaving skills belonging to one of our boys who lives on the street. Making mats out of plastic, his hidden talent has now been used to brighten …

Recently, our team fell in love with the weaving skills belonging to one of our boys who lives on the street. Making mats out of plastic, his hidden talent has now been used to brighten our homes at Doyle Farm.


We see so much talent present in the children we interact with everyday in Kenya. From those that reside with us at Doyle Farm to the children who visit us at the feeding program. Often, without the encouragement of peers through family, school, or employment, they don’t even realise their skills are special. Recognising these talents, we seek to support, nurture, and encourage them when we can. This may be through our established pathways like the Rafiki Social program or through small acts of support and acknowledgement within our interactions.

Recently our Feeding Program staff noticed one of the boys had an amazing talent of making door mats. Impressed by his work, Aunty Conci purchased one from him. Rafiki Mwema then purchased more for the houses at Doyle Farm.

On the support, our Feeding Program staff said:

“Initially we only thought that they could be doormats or mad scrubs. But then there was the idea of wall decor. It felt good to see that most of staff at the farm liked the creativity from the boys at the Feeding Program.

“How I wish we can have more creative works from the boys. The boy was happy with his work and he felt acknowledged. With this I think he will be motivated even to do more beautiful things.”

A talent learnt on the streets

On his skill, the boy shared he had learnt it from a group of people who came to town and taught the street boys and girls to weave. The activity was free and open to anyone who wanted to learn. The mat Conci bought was the first time he had weaved since being taught and he was just reminding himself.

The plastics he uses are sourced for free, but he buys the metallic for binding the plastic together to make the mat. If he has all the materials he can make two to three mats a day. He also makes fruit basket with the plastic rods.

Since we purchased the matts the boy has started another business and can now be found selling boiled eggs around town.


If you’d like to support the work of our Feeding Program team, you can find out more HERE. It costs us around 9,500 KSH (approximately $130 AUD) every day to support the street families that come to us. We cannot remove them from town but we can make sure they eat each day, that someone checks in with how they are doing. We invite you to help us make a difference. Join us HERE.


Rafiki Mwema Registered Charity
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